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Training Up Leaders


Pray not for lighter burdens, but for stronger backs.
–Theodore Roosevelt

As a culture we are losing our most valuable resource—male leadership. Young men have grown up in an age of cultural suspicion, and they have found that it is difficult to exercise any kind of leadership without raising someone’s ire.
Cultures that allow families and communities to exist with no stable, healthy male authority and leadership devolve into chaos. Healthy masculine leadership protects the weak. It uses its influence and power to provide safe, life-giving encouragement and provision.

A healthy man doesn’t shirk his responsibilities. He undertakes tasks with a “can-do” attitude and does not gripe or grumble when they become difficult or times become tough. He provides for his family as part of his manly duty. He takes pride in solving his own problems. He willingly shoulders his duties and doesn’t face his responsibilities sullenly. Aubrey Andelin says, “His acceptance of this responsibility adds substance to the faith his wife places in him when she leaves the security of her parents’ home to make her way with him.”

Boys need to hear words like strong, brave, talented, and noble in order to assimilate their duty as leaders. They need to have the adults in their lives intentionally speak affirming language that inspires and uplifts them to willingly assume the mantle that leadership imposes upon him. They need to be taught to relish the satisfaction that duty and honor bring to a man.

I am blessed and fortunate to continuously see the fruits that my ministry labors produce. To live a life where people frequently contact you to say that you made a difference or changed their lives and the lives of their families is an awesomely gratifying experience that carries with it great responsibility. Many men who know me look at my life with envy, but few are willing to make the sacrifices or take the risks necessary to achieve it. We need to encourage boys from a young age that God has a special plan for their lives. We need to train them early to be leaders and prepare them for the responsibility that comes with that role. We need to be intentional in equipping them with a bigger vision of what life is about rather than just letting them “settle” for whatever life throws at them. We need to inspire them to use the gifts and powers that God has endowed them with to make a difference in the world.

When we do that, not only will men become men again, but the world will be better because of it.

Question: What does being a leader look like to you. Talk with your son about the burdens of responsibility.

1 reply
  1. Anonymous
    Anonymous says:

    "He takes pride in solving his own problems." I think this can cause a man to stumble. Currently being in a separated state from my husband who walked out on our family to find his own happiness, this comes from experience. He refuses to seek counseling, professionally or from our ministers. Flat out refuses. "God never puts more on you than you can handle," is not an accurate statement, and I think men need to know that if God didn't put more on them than they could handle, they would have no need for God! I think it is time men started letting go of the pride of "I can handle this on my own," and recognize that they weren't MEANT to handle it on their own. Granted, this is coming from a heart that has been broken by betrayal, loss and anger, so my perspective may be cloudy. But the longer we keep telling men "suck it up, you can handle it," the longer they will refuse counseling and continue to walk away from their covenant relationships.

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